Sept. 18, 2017: Mine way

Sept. 18, 2017: Mine way
 

One morning, over a cup of piping hot cocoa, a daily habit I inherited from my grandmother (who lived till she was 102, so there must be something in those beans), l pondered if I should write about the recent Mining Philippines 2017 conference that was held last September 5-7 at the Sofitel Manila. My initial hesitation was brought about by the fact that I am part of a Group that is into natural resource development, so my opus might come across to most as rather contrived.

This, not to mention the many times I was invited as resource person in several forums on mining and even interviewed occasionally to speak for the industry.

Sept. 17, 2017: Can mining industry weather the policy storm? | BusinessMirror

Sept. 17, 2017: Can mining industry weather the policy storm? | BusinessMirror
 

OVER the past several years, the mining industry has experienced a policy storm—from the imposition of a moratorium on new mining permits and designation of “mining no-go zones” with the signing of Executive Order (EO) 79 under the Aquino administration, to a stricter mine-audit process that led to closure or suspension orders affecting more than two dozen mining operations, cancellation of 75 mineral production sharing agreements (MPSAs) and the ban on open-pit mining method all over the country within the first year of the Duterte administration.

President Duterte expressed his dismay several times over the environmental destruction caused by irresponsible miners, which, he said, are making huge profits but are not taking care of the environment and the affected mining communities.

Under a new leadership, the Chamber of Mines of the Philippines (COMP), an organization composed of the mining industry’s big players, is seeking to reverse these policies, hoping for a better policy environment that will see the industry grow and achieve its full potential.

Sept. 16, 2017: Filipino business, government representatives tour mine

Sept. 16, 2017: Filipino business, government representatives tour mine
 

NEW Acland Mine is attracting international interest.

Filipino business and government representatives toured the operation last Tuesday.

Joined by The University of Queensland’s Sustainable Minerals Institute (SMI), the delegation explored New Acland’s environmental and social initiatives.

The delegation’s tour was the tenth this year of an international group to site.

Sept. 15, 2017: Echo chamber of mines

Sept. 15, 2017: Echo chamber of mines
 

By design and by default, enclosed concrete spaces heavily secured in built structures exclude. Insiders isolate themselves from the wild natural world outside. They validate each other’s truths and cement their beliefs, so they only receive dubious outsiders, who undergo security checks, satisfy decorum requirements and speak the language. Voices harmonize and synchronize to the point of unison, as if hearing a fellow insider’s voice is no different from hearing one’s own, conjuring delusions of grandeur and visions of the future under the industry they thought they have built with their own hands. Their noble vocation, essential. Their technological knowledge, absolute. Their corporate confidence, intact. Thus, they tremble and panic when proven wrong.

The walled echo chamber that svelte insiders trusted to be impenetrable ended up shattered. Their mines were never theirs. The resources they plundered belong to generations of indigenous peoples across the archipelago, who are now in solidarity and are standing up as “national minorities”. Setting aside cultural differences, they unite as Sandugo (one blood), a national alliance of Moro and indigenous peoples who marched to the capital to share the lives and struggles of indigenous communities existing in the fringes of Philippine society.

Sept. 15, 2017: Kalinga alarmed by transport of boulders

Sept. 15, 2017: Kalinga alarmed by transport of boulders
 

TABUK CITY, Kalinga: Local residents in the province are alarmed by the continuous transport of boulders from Chico River to other towns and Cagayan in spite the resolution by the Provincial Board stopping its hauling.

Photos of the haulers have recently been posted on social media touching off spirited discussions with retired prosecutor Arthur Kub-ao Sr. going as far as calling the activity “raid, rape and plunder of our natural resources along the Chico River.”

The Sangguniang Panlalawigan (SP) Committee on Environmental Protection, Natural Resources and Energy on Wednesday called a meeting following complaints from residents along the road to Tuguegarao City saying their sleep at night is disturbed by rumbling of trucks. They also expressed concern that heavy trucks might affect the weak Aliog Bridge in Barangay Nambaran.

Sept. 15, 2017: Dinagat Islands’s top miner steps up nickel shipment to China | BusinessMirror

Sept. 15, 2017: Dinagat Islands’s top miner steps up nickel shipment to China | BusinessMirror
 

DINAGAT ISLANDS—The Cagdianao Mining Corp. (CMC) is stepping up operations for 12 more shipments of nickel ore to China by the second week of November.

So far, the company had completed 25 shipments—all to China.  The loading of the 26th and 27th shipments unto the barge is ongoing, Noah S. Balonzo, mine-production supervisor of CMC, told the BusinessMirror.

A wholly owned subsidiary of Nickel Asia Corp. (NAC), CMC is one of three nickel-mining companies that continue to operate in Dinagat Islands, following former Environment Secretary Regina Paz L. Lopez’s crackdown against irresponsible mining.

Sept. 15, 2017: Oceana unveils expansion plans

Sept. 15, 2017: Oceana unveils expansion plans
 
Oceana Gold has unveiled a 10-year corporate strategy for more expansion, in the process outlining plenty of potential for mine life extensions at its Macraes site in East Otago and Waihi in the central North Island.

Oceana’s general manager at Macraes, Dale Oram, was upbeat and candid in his presentation at the New Zealand branch of the Australian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy annual conference this week, in front of most of the 220 delegates attending.

He said in the long term Oceana wanted to continue on its path of geographic diversity and eventually operate five to seven mines; it at present has two in New Zealand, one in the northern Philippines and a soon to be fully commissioned new mine in the state of South Carolina in the United States being handed over on October 1.

Sept. 15, 2017: Cagdianao Mining Corporation eyes 12 ore shipments by Nov.

Sept. 15, 2017: Cagdianao Mining Corporation eyes 12 ore shipments by Nov.
 

Dinagat Islands – Cagdianao Mining Corporation (CMC), a subsidiary of listed mining firm Nickel Asia Corp. (NAC), is set to boost its operations to complete 12 more shipments of nickel ore to China by November.

CMC Mine Production Supervisor Noah Balonzo said the company had so far completed 25 shipments to China.

Right now, a couple of shipments are currently being loaded into the barge. Each shipment carries 55,000 wet metric tons of nickel ore.

 

Sept. 12, 2017: Philippines: Marcventures getting $22m in merger with two mining firms

Sept. 12, 2017: Philippines: Marcventures getting $22m in merger with two mining firms
 
Marcventures Holding Inc, engaged in mineral development in the Philippines, is merging with Asia Pilot Mining Philippines Corp (APMPC), and BrightGreen Resources Holdings Inc (BHI) in a deal valued at $22.1 million (P1.125 billion). The company plans to issue a total of 1.125 billion shares priced at P1.00 apiece for the merger, that is 675 million shares in favor of APMPC shareholders, and 450 million shares in favor of BHI shareholders. Both APMPC and BHI will be folded into Marcventures subject to approval of the shareholders.

Read more at: https://www.dealstreetasia.com/stories/philippines-marcventures-getting-22m-in-merger-with-two-mining-firms-82100/

Sept. 11, 2017: Do we want more open-pit mines?

Sept. 11, 2017: Do we want more open-pit mines?
 

Something made me shiver in fear as I read the news that the inter-agency Mining Industry Coordinating Council will review the ban on open pit mining which was ordered by the former Environment Secretary, Gina Lopez. What worsened my anxiety was the announcement by the Mines and Geosciences Bureau that it has submitted a recommendation to the Environment Secretary, Roy Cimatu, to lift the ban on the basis of internationally accepted and legal mining methods.

Even assuming for argument’s sake that internationally accepted and legal methods will be used in creating more open pit mines in the Philippines, the fact will always remain that once mountains are lopped off and the earth is excavated, destroying everything that’s living in and around it to give way to some 50 or 60 stories deep of open-pit mines, no amount of rehabilitation or technology can bring them back. The open-pit mines will forever remain to be open pits—gaping holes that are unproductive and dangerous to all living things because the artificial lakes created by the open pits contain toxic mine tailings and acid water. But this, in fact, is still just a teeny weeny peek into the horrific scenario caused by open pit mines. The reality is, because of the geographic configuration of the Philippines with more than 7,100 islands when the earth is excavated to create open pits for mining purposes, a water table is invariably hit, wasting the water in it. This is frightening because studies have shown that in 2030 there will be a global shortage of water.